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Music Must Destroy – The Ruts DC. Review by http://nemm.org.uk

Thanks http://nemm.org.uk for a wonderful review 🙂

Music Must Destroy – The Ruts DC

the-ruts-dc

The Ruts DC are back with ‘Music Must Destroy’ – their first LP release since ‘Animal Now’ in 1981.

Despite the wait The Ruts DC have been persistent influence in punk and rock through the years and here they are aided and abetted by some of their musical admirers: Boz Boorer (Morrissey) Captain Sensible (The Damned) Jake Burns (SLF) Kirk Brandon (Spear of Destiny) and last but by no means least Henry Rollins.

 

Bass player John “Segs” Jennings explains why it took so long…

“For a long time I didn’t want to re-form – it felt a bit cheap. It had to have integrity, but then I thought let’s do some of the songs we all love, the music that changed all our lives, and how poignant they were. He goes on, “I see it more of a continuation rather than a reformation and there’s some great tunes on Music Must Destroy.”

This new album is as excellently eclectic as you would hope from a band born out of the multi-culturalism of the late 70s anti-racist punk scene and the collaborations help the record feel fresh and relevant.

The tragic passing of lead singer Malcom Owen during the crest of their success in 1981 and the passing in 2007 of drummer Paul Fox has meant that singer/bass player Segs and drummer Dave Ruffy have carried the flag of The Ruts DC through live shows, with Leigh Heggarty on guitar

“They are not with us anymore but they are still so intertwined with The Ruts history. Many times I’ve thought this is just too difficult, to carry on without them, because I miss them both dearly. But we are still flying the flag for them and there’s a ballad about Malcolm and Paul on the new record.”

Now, with renewed vigour The Ruts DC are producing original material as good as anything they’ve created in the past.

Possibly most well known for their commercial hit ‘Staring at The Rude Boys’ in 1980 The Ruts have that rare talent of veering from punk to ska, to reggae, to rock to ballad and always sound authentic and powerful- simultaneously melodic and fist-clenchingly angry. This is evident in ‘Psychic Attack’, the first single that was released in May. It’s a thundering track that seems to be about pressure and persecution.

“Look at this government who have such a disregard for people, closing libraries and destroying public services based on the whim of an accountant’s spread sheet. It sickens me and the song is a reflection of how we feel at the moment.”

Eggs continues’ “I’m 60 now but I’m just as angry about the injustices in the world as I did when I was a kid in The Ruts. It’s important to know that you are not alone in your struggle. Our message is still the same – people unite.”

Another stand-out track is the John Lennon-esque ‘Peace Bomb’ – a slower tempo swaying ballad of peace that is stirring and heartfelt. Then there is ‘Tears Catch Fire’ which has a groovy seven count, jangling guitars and hypnotic bass groove- it’s a pop rock song but doesn’t feel out of place here.

The album ends with the quite glorious ‘Golden Boy’, a real tear jerker proving The Ruts DC can deliver a punch to your solar plexus one minute and a tender caress the next.

I recently saw Henry Rollins at The Edinburgh Fringe (the same week he actually recorded his part for Music Must Destroy) and hearing him talk about peace, socialism and music and being so passionate about how art and kindness can elevate us somehow; I can’t help but wish there were more old punks around to give us a bit of a slap around the head and inspire us.

“Look at this government who have such a disregard for people, closing libraries and destroying public services based on the whim of an accountant’s spread sheet. It sickens me and the song is a reflection of how we feel at the moment.”

Eggs continues’ “I’m 60 now but I’m just as angry about the injustices in the world as I did when I was a kid in The Ruts. It’s important to know that you are not alone in your struggle. Our message is still the same – people unite.”

Another stand-out track is the John Lennon-esque ‘Peace Bomb’ – a slower tempo swaying ballad of peace that is stirring and heartfelt. Then there is ‘Tears Catch Fire’ which has a groovy seven count, jangling guitars and hypnotic bass groove- it’s a pop rock song but doesn’t feel out of place here.

The album ends with the quite glorious ‘Golden Boy’, a real tear jerker proving The Ruts DC can deliver a punch to your solar plexus one minute and a tender caress the next.

I recently saw Henry Rollins at The Edinburgh Fringe (the same week he actually recorded his part for Music Must Destroy) and hearing him talk about peace, socialism and music and being so passionate about how art and kindness can elevate us somehow; I can’t help but wish there were more old punks around to give us a bit of a slap around the head and inspire us.

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RUTS DC – Music Must Destroy. Review by http://punkonline.co.uk

Thanks punkonline for a nice review 🙂

RUTS DC – Music Must Destroy

ruts-dcWith some excellent accompanying videos, Ruts DC are back with an absolute belter of a new album. They have always been a band keen to explore new sonic landscapes with well-documented forays into dub and reggae in their catalog. Psychic Attack is the opening track of the new album that was funded via the excellent Pledge Music crowd-funding platform. The song is a completely fresh sound for the band full of power chords and a great guitar lick. It’s some return from the boys – urgent, somewhat foreboding in atmosphere and had me salivating anticipating more!

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Ruts DC – Music Must Destroy Review by SoundBlab

Thanks soundblab for this wonderful review 🙂
Ruts DC are back and the album Music must Destroy has more to do with their punk power as opposed to their dub diligence. The single Psychic Attack kicks off proceedings at a fast and furious pace that proves that this band can still cut the momentum mustard! From there the title track does not put its foot to the pedal but its vehemence is evident from the visceral vocals and the guitar gusto. Surprise is next and this fiery fare is as close to a Malcolm Owen led tune by The Ruts as proceedings can get.

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Ruts DC – Music Must Destroy

RUTS_newphoto_RingMasterReview

Back in the day, The Ruts stood to the fore of the punk scene in sound, presence, and lyrical insight, an attack which evolved but never diminished as Ruts DC emerged from the sad death of still missed frontman Malcolm Owen. Two albums before and two after his passing provided an innovative and snarling voice for a generation and more before the band disbanded. Reforming for a benefit show for their guitarist Paul Fox, following his diagnosis of lung cancer and who died not long after, remaining members John ‘Segs’ Jennings (bass and vocals) and Dave Ruffy (drums) carried on and released the mighty Rhythm Collision Vol. 2, another glorious dub fuelled vat of diversity to echo the success of Vol.1. Now the band are poised to uncage a new tour-de-force in the shape of Music Must Destroy, a release, to get straight to the bottom line, which is quite possibly the finest rock ‘n’ roll album you are likely to be aroused by this year, maybe this decade.

 

Music Must Destroy is one glorious anthem made up of ten ear and imagination sparking proposals. Segs and Duffy with Leigh Heggarty have taken their time to write, hone, and step forward with their latest collection of songs but, aided by a host of guests such as Henry Rollins, Captain Sensible, Boz Boorer, Marco Pirroni, Jake Burns, Kirk Brandon, Tara Rez, and Paul Laventhol, have created another landmark in punk fuelled rock ‘n roll. The album’s variety of incitements sit somewhere between the raw challenge of The Ruts and the experimental exploits of Ruts DC, the band calling themselves The Ruts DC for the new offering suggesting the band came at the album from the same angle. The trio has explored their past and inspirations across the fan funded Music Must Destroy to create some of their most inspiring and fiercely addictive songs yet.

It all starts with recent single Psychic Attack, it alone a highly charged and intoxicating incitement to get greedy over. With a Damned like scent to its riffs, the song strides from its initial shimmer with imposing rhythms and one mouth-watering bassline. Within seconds the nagging riffs and Segs’ potent tones grip ears further, his words and expression getting as much under the skin as the twisting and turning character of the song itself.

Starting off a release with such a momentous moment would put a strain on many offerings from other bands, but The Ruts DC simply follow it up with matching peaks of imagination starting with the band’s upcoming new single and album’s title track. Featuring Henry Rollins, Music Must Destroy also makes its initial coaxing with rhythmic and repetitive guitar shared bait which needs mere seconds to get under the skin. Melodies and drama spread as the song expands its theatre of intent, group harmonies pure infection around Rollin’s call to arms before a chorus to stir armies pulls thoughts and spirit into the song’s galvanic prowl.

The Ruts DCart_RingMasterReviewSurprise steps forward next carrying a broader rock air to invasive seduction. Like a blend of Ruts single West One (Shine on Me) and the sound of 999 at certain times, the track crawls over the senses, sweeping them up into another virulent chorus and nature before the highly emotive and haunting Second Hand Child takes over. This too infests body and emotions with ease, its poetic melodies and evocative vocals as magnetic as its sound with the dusty lure of The Duel’s Tara Rez’s voice extra temptation to be tempted by.

Soft City Lights is another recalling the early days of the band, its reflective melodies and shimmer infused in a smouldering embrace of evocative adventure and harmony. With rhythms casting darker shadows and intimidation, the track is aural alchemy and like those before it and indeed to come quite irresistible, a success emulated by the anthemic and predacious roar of Kill The Pain. A track which stalks the listener with a challenge in its voice as potent as the virulence in its infectious character, it too has bodies bouncing and attitude aflame.

The mellow seducing and evocative pleads of Peace Bomb follows, the song a Bolan-esque engagement showing more of the album’s diversity, variety continuing  across the psychedelic shimmer and melodic jangle of Tears On Fire and the hard rock soaked exploits of The Vox Teardrop. It is impossible to pick a best track within Music Must Destroy but the first of the pair always features in first thoughts while its successor simply stirs blood and spirit each and every time.

The album concludes with Golden Boy, a poignant ballad seemingly inspired by the death of previous band mates and a captivation as powerful as anything before it with its heart offered vocals, emotionally charged melodies, and provocative strings.

The track is a breath-taking end to a simply electrifying rip roar of an album. Music Must Destroy has all the qualities and boldness expected of The Ruts/Ruts DC past and present. The guys might be a touch older than those early inspiring days but they still have the energy, snarl, and invention to provide something seriously special which can also spark a new generation.

Music Must Destroy is released September 16th via Westworld/Sosumi Recordings with the single/title track released September 9th.

Album pre-order links: CD digi: http://bit.ly/MusicMustDestroyCD and Vinyl double album: http://bit.ly/MusicMustDestroyVinyl

http://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/ruts-dc-psychic-attack

https://www.facebook.com/theruts   http://www.theruts.co.uk/

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THE RUTS DC – MUSIC MUST DESTROY

Thanks www.repeatfanzine.co.uk for a wonderful review 🙂

THE RUTS DC – MUSIC MUST DESTROY

The Ruts were a band that never took any shit. Back when they started playing live in the late 70’s, gigs, and especially punk gigs, were scary places to be. You usually took your life in your hands attending and ran a fare chance of coming home with a few less teeth than when you went out. Whilst several bands, such as The Clash, tried to quell the violence by actively pleading with their audience, many were, at best, ambivalent to the melee unfolding in the crowd. But not The Ruts. Whilst not actively seeking or condoning aggro, led by their man-mountain singer Malcolm Owen, they were more than capable of looking after themselves should the need arise.

On a dark, cold and wet evening in 1979 I went along to Cardiff University intending to enjoy two of the best punk bands around at that time. The Damned, fresh from their reformation, were headlining whilst the aforementioned Ruts opened proceedings. Unfortunately, no one had told a certain section of the audience that this was supposed to be a pleasurable experience, as they laid boots and fists into anybody within close proximity. Back then there were no crash barriers at the front of the stage, only a thin line made up of innocent students and the band’s road crew separating bands from the crowd. Tension mounted as several short haired attendees made a nuisance of themselves with acts of random violence. In fairness to Malcolm he gave them more than one warning but, after one too many casual punches, the band fought back. I still remember the house lights going out, darkness ensuing, the sound of instruments hitting the floor and band members silhouettes jumping from the stage. Fast forward a minute or so and normality, of a sort, had resumed with the lights re-established and the band back on the stage. But not so for several of the wannabe pugilists as they departed the scene dragging the rather dazed torso of their leader with them. Instant karma!

Sadly, despite the commercial success they were shortly to gain – Babylon’s Burning, Staring at the Rude Boys, West One etc – Malcolm wasn’t to be with us much longer. Whilst the band continued on after his sad demise as the Ruts DC, by 1982 the game was up and they disbanded. In 2007 they played once again. However, this was not the celebration it should have been as they had reformed, with Henry Rollins on vocals, as a benefit for guitarist Paul Fox’s who was battling cancer. Sadly, it was a fight he would ultimately lose the same year. Thereafter, the two remaining founder members, bass player John “Segs” Jennings and drummer Dave Ruffy, only intermittently recorded and played the occasional gig.

So it was a pleasant surprise to receive an advance copy of their new CD “Music Must Destroy” recently. Now a threesome, being augmented by Leigh Heggarty on guitar, the album boast collaborators such as Boz Boorer (Morrissey and Adam Ant), Captain Sensible (The Damned), Jake Burns (Stiff Little Fingers), Kirk Brandon (Spear of Destiny) and, once again, Henry Rollins (Black Flag).

Starting with the thunderous roar of drums and bass line, opening track and single “Psychic Attack” delivers an aural punk rock punch to the guts. Slower, but no less anthemic, “Music Must Destroy” is darn catchy. The distorted vocoder-like vocals give it a different feel to the Ruts of old, but the repeated chant of “We are not your property!” show that the band have lost none of the fire in their bellies. “Surprise” starts with an almost Stone Roses “I am the Resurrection” beginning, but this doesn’t last long and another mid to fast tempo number ensues, resplendent with Banshee/Cure guitars, whilst “Second Hand Child” has an almost mid-80’s AOR feel

Soft City Lights” with an opening reminiscent of “It was Cold” from their debut album “The Crack”, transported me back to those heady days of the late 70s when bands like The Ruts created a seismic shift in British music. “Kill the Pain” delivers another fast paced, adrenaline fuelled slice of good old punk rock, whilst “Peace Bomb” is a slower tempo. Bizarrely, whether due to the sound or subject matter, I could see John Lennon performing it in his heyday.

“Tears on Fire” is almost psychedelic at times and penultimate track “The Vox Teardrop” also has a strange, sci-fi intro, but soon settles into a rattling good four minutes of heavy rock. The band have chosen a slow number to finish in “Golden Boy” that works well after the maelstrom of noise that had preceded it on the album. Give the lyrics, I can’t help thinking that some of the words refer the wasted potential of dear old Malcolm.

So there you have it, one of the leaders of the second wave of punk still going strong. Whilst they will never be able to replace their fallen comrades, nor do I expect they want to, it’s good to see them able to still crank out first class punk rock and maintain a presence on the live circuit. I’m sure Malcolm and Paul are smiling down on the legacy the Ruts DC continue to create.

Bones

http://www.theruts.co.uk/

RIP Malcolm and Paul